no more bottled water.

I’m a rule follower. When someone of authority tells me to do something, I do it. And when I break rules or recommendations, I do so only with intense anxiousness.

Before we left for Costa Rica, I called my doctor’s travel clinic to talk about our trip. We had all the necessary vaccinations, but the lady I spoke with emphasized that we should not drink the tap water there. I asked a few follow up questions, because what I’d read had made me think the tap water was safe in Costa Rica, but this woman insisted there were serious health risks.

DSC02451^^costa rica sunset. february 2014^^

I hate buying water. I hate creating unnecessary waste. Both of these principles are hard to stick to when you’re traveling in a place without potable water. I’ve spent a good deal of time in China, and it’s actually not hard there, because boiled water is readily available. When I studied abroad in Harbin in 2003, I’d fill my Nalgene with boiled water and stick it out on the windowsill to cool off. Sure, bottled water was cheap. But think of all the people in China. If they’re all drinking water from bottles, imagine how many plastic bottles that is. Where do they all go?

ForbidCityLady^^woman sweeping up trash at the forbidden city in beijing. taken by my mom when visiting me in december 2003.^^

But back to Costa Rica. While there, we bought bottled water. 6L jugs of it usually, so only 4 or 5 were needed to get us through the 10 days. But still, those bottles made my heart hurt. Especially when an expat in line at the supermarket lectured me about how Costa Rica’s drinking water was totally safe. I know, lady, you’re preaching to the choir. But I didn’t want to risk it with Willa, and getting sick was not in our vacation plans. I didn’t want to go against what my doctor had advised.

DSC02141^^selvatura park. monteverde, costa rica. february 2014.^^

But during our trip, I vowed I’d do something different the next time. Once home, I went through my bookmarks and favorited tweets, and found two fantastic organizations I’d previously heard about: Ban the Bottle, and Travelers Against Plastic. I’ve been following Ban the Bottle for a few years since I support their mission of: “eliminating plastic bottles in schools, offices and public areas…[so] we can eliminate unneeded waste in landfills.” Travelers Against Plastic has a different, but potentially even more important slant. Their mission is to “educate global travelers about the harmful impacts of plastic water bottles usage and encourage travelers to be prepared to clean their own drinking water.”

DSC06181^^GUILTY! penang, malaysia. july 2011.^^

On their resources page, they recommend a few methods: a SteriPEN, which is likely familiar to those who go camping, as well as old fashioned iodine tablets. We used to use those when I went to summer camp, and the water always had an odd taste. But apparently they’re more advanced now and you can get neutralizing tablets which elimiate it.

As someone who cares a lot about these types of issues, I am mad at myself for not thinking more about this before our trip. It would have been so easy to buy a $50 SteriPEN or pack a few iodine tablets which are even cheaper! But even I didn’t think of it. The only way to make change is to educate people. I’m glad I’ve been thinking about it lately. I hope you, too, will think twice before buying a bottle of water?

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “no more bottled water.

  1. If you haven’t already found it, there’s a good book called “Bottled and Sold” which does a pretty good, readable job of discussing the environmental aspects of bottled water and how we got sold this fake bill of goods that we should buy bottled water

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s